Epidemiology and Infection



Health burden in the Netherlands due to infection with thermophilic Campylobacter spp.


A. H. HAVELAAR a1c1, M. A. S. de WIT a2, R. van KONINGSVELD a3 and E. van KEMPEN a4
a1 Microbiological Laboratory for Health Protection, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands
a2 Department of Infectious Diseases Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands
a3 Department of Neurology, Erasmus Medical Center, P.O. Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands
a4 Laboratory of Exposure Assessment and Environmental Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands

Abstract

Infection with thermophilic Campylobacter spp. usually leads to an episode of acute gastroenteritis. Occasionally, more severe diseases may be induced, notably Guillain–Barré syndrome and reactive arthritis. For some, the disease may be fatal. We have integrated available data in one public health measure, the Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY). DALYs are the sum of Years of Life Lost by premature mortality and Years Lived with Disability, weighted with a factor between 0 and 1 for the severity of illness. The mean health burden of campylobacter-associated illness in the Dutch population in the period 1990–5 is estimated as 1400 (90% CI 900–2000) DALY per year. The main determinants of health burden are acute gastroenteritis (440 DALY), gastroenteritis related mortality (310 DALY) and residual symptoms of Guillain–Barré syndrome (340 DALY). Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that alternative model assumptions produced results in the above-mentioned range.

(Accepted September 1 2000)


Correspondence:
c1 Author for correspondence.


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