Parasitology



A myxozoan-like parasite causing xenomas in the brain of the mole, Talpa europaea L., 1758 (Vertebrata, Mammalia)


C. FRIEDRICH a1, E. INGOLIC a2, B. FREITAG a1, G. KASTBERGER a1c1, V. HOHMANN a3, G. SKOFITSCH a1, U. NEUMEISTER a1 and O. KEPKA a1 1
a1 Institut für Zoologie, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz, Universitätsplatz 2, A-8010 Graz, Austria
a2 Forschungsinstitut für Elektronenmikroskopie, Technische Universität Graz, Steyrergasse 17, A-8010 Graz, Austria
a3 Aventis Pharma Deutschland GmbH, Königsteiner Strasse 10, D-65812 Bad Soden a. T., Germany

Abstract

Light and transmission electron microscopy revealed pericytes of brain capillaries of moles (Talpa europaea L., 1758) as parasitized intracellularly. These host cells were enlarged and of globular or ellipsoid shape, and incorporated a cell-within-cell sequence of primary, secondary and, rarely found, tertiary developmental stages of an eukaryotic organism. Other stages like spores were not discovered either in brain or in other organs. Due to the vertebrate host, and the parasitic cells showing the enveloped state this parasite can be classified as belonging to the Myxozoa rather than Paramyxea. Since spores, which would allow an exact identification of the parasite, could not be detected and mammals are very unusual hosts for Myxozoa, the parasite was designated a myxozoan-like organism.

(Received January 17 2000)
(Revised April 20 2000)
(Accepted May 12 2000)


Key Words: myxozoan-like organism; brain xenomas; Talpa europaea; ultrastructure.

Correspondence:
c1 Corresponding author: Institut für Zoologie, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz, Universitätsplatz 2, A-8010 Graz, Austria. Tel: 0043 316 380 5613. Fax: 0043 316 380 9875. E-mail: gerald.kastberger@kfunigraz.ac.at


Footnotes

1 Professor Dr Otto Kepka who was greatly engaged in this work died in 1996.



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