Applied Psycholinguistics

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Applied Psycholinguistics (2009), 30:659-684 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009
doi:10.1017/S0142716409990063

Articles

Orthographic influences, vocabulary development, and phonological awareness in deaf children who use cochlear implants


DEBORAH JAMESa1 c1, KAUKAB RAJPUTa2, JULIE BRINTONa3 and USHA GOSWAMIa4

a1 University of Newcastle
a2 Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, UK
a3 Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, UK
a4 University of Cambridge
Article author query
james d [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
rajput k [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
brinton j [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
goswami u [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]

ABSTRACT

In the current study, we explore the influence of orthographic knowledge on phonological awareness in children with cochlear implants and compare developmental associations to those found for hearing children matched for word reading level or chronological age. We show an influence of orthographic knowledge on syllable and phoneme awareness in deaf and hearing children, but no orthographic effect on rhyme awareness. Nonorthographic rhyme awareness was a significant predictor of reading outcomes for all groups. However, whereas receptive vocabulary knowledge was the most important predictor of word reading variance in the cochlear implant group, rhyme awareness was the only important predictor of word reading variance in the reading level matched hearing group. Both vocabulary and rhyme awareness were equally important in predicting reading in the chronological age-matched hearing group. The data suggest that both deaf and hearing children are influenced by orthography when making phonological judgments, and that phonological awareness and vocabulary are both important for reading development.

(Received November 01 2005)

(Accepted April 04 2009)

Correspondence:

c1 ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE Deborah James, School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences, University of Newcastle, King George VI Building, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK. E-mail: d.m.james@ncl.ac.uk


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