Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy

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Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy (2009), 37:397-402 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies 2009
doi:10.1017/S135246580999018X

Research Article

Impact of Mindfulness on Cognition and Affect in Voice Hearing: Evidence from Two Case Studies


Katherine Newman Taylora1 c1, Sean Harpera2 and Paul Chadwicka3

a1 Hampshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, and University of Southampton, UK
a2 Lothian NHS Trust, Midlothian, UK
a3 Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, UK
Article author query
newman taylor k [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
harper s [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
chadwick p [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]

Abstract

Background: There is a small body of research indicating that mindfulness training can be beneficial for people with distressing psychosis. What is not yet clear is whether mindfulness effects change in affect and cognition associated with voices specifically. This study examined the hypothesis that mindfulness training alone would lead to change in distress and cognition (belief conviction) in people with distressing voices. Method: Two case studies are presented. Participants experienced long-standing distressing voices. Belief conviction and distress were measured twice weekly through baseline and mindfulness intervention. Mindfulness in relation to voices was measured at the start of baseline and end of intervention. Results: Following a relatively stable baseline phase, after 2–3 weeks of mindfulness practice, belief conviction and distress fell for both participants. Both participants' mindfulness scores were higher post treatment. Conclusion: Findings show that mindfulness training has an impact on cognition and affect specifically associated with voices, and thereby beneficially alters relationship with voices.

Keywords:Mindfulness; voices; belief conviction; distress

Correspondence:

c1 Reprint requests to Katherine Newman Taylor, Department of Psychiatry, Royal South Hants Hospital, Southampton SO14 0YG, UK. E-mail: katherine.newman-taylor@hantspt-sw.nhs.uk


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