Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society



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Neuropsychological and psychiatric functioning pre- and posthematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult cancer patients: A preliminary study


LEIGH J.  BEGLINGER  a1 c1 , KEVIN  DUFF  a1 , SARA  VAN DER HEIDEN  a1 , DAVID J.  MOSER  a1 , JOHN D.  BAYLESS  a1 , JANE S.  PAULSEN  a1 and ROGER  GINGRICH  a2
a1 Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa
a2 Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa

Article author query
beglinger lj   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
duff k   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
van der heiden s   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
moser dj   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
bayless jd   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
paulsen js   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
gingrich r   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

The current study characterizes cognitive and psychiatric status in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients shortly before and after transplant. Thirty adult patients were assessed prospectively 1–2 weeks before transplantation and 100 days posttransplantation on neuropsychological and psychiatric measures. Before transplant, participants showed mild impairments on several neuropsychological measures, with the poorest performances occurring on learning and attention. Psychiatric functioning was significantly elevated compared with normative data. Significant improvements, however, were observed on neuropsychological measures by 100 days after transplant. Depression and anxiety scores also improved. Candidates for HSCT experienced mild diffuse cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric morbidity before the procedure, but these symptoms significantly improved by 3 months following their transplant in this small sample. Education about these possible pretransplant sequelae and the potential for rebound may be helpful to patients and families as they prepare for this treatment and the recovery period (JINS, 2007, 13, 172–177.)

(Received May 1 2006)
(Revised August 2 2006)
(Accepted August 7 2006)


Key Words: Bone marrow transplantation; Cognition; Cancer; Attention; Recovery; Depression; Anxiety; Practice effects.

Correspondence:
c1 Correspondence and reprint request to: Leigh J. Beglinger, Ph.D., University of Iowa, Department of Psychiatry, MEB 1-321, Iowa City, IA 52242-1000, USA. E-mail: leigh-beglinger@uiowa.edu


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