Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society



Neuropsychiatric predictors of return to work in HIV/AIDS


WILFRED G.  VAN GORP  a1 c1 , JUDITH G.  RABKIN  a1 a2 , STEPHEN J.  FERRANDO  a3 , JIM  MINTZ  a5 , ELIZABETH  RYAN  a4 , THOMAS  BORKOWSKI  a2 and MARTIN  MCELHINEY  a2
a1 Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, New York
a2 New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York
a3 Department of Psychiatry, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York
a4 Departments of Psychiatry & Pathology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York
a5 Department of Psychiatry, UCLA Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California

Article author query
van gorp wg   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
rabkin jg   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
ferrando sj   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
mintz j   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
ryan e   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
borkowski t   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
mcelhiney m   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

This study followed 118 HIV+ individuals who had taken steps to return to work to determine facilitators or barriers in returning to work. Over the two-year study period, 52% of the participants obtained employment. Memory function served as the most potent predictor of obtaining employment. Persons who were younger, did not have a diagnosis of AIDS and who had shorter periods of unemployment prior to entering the study also had better chances of finding employment during the study. After finding employment, participants reported lower levels of depression as well, an apparent result of their obtaining employment. These findings indicate that memory is a key neuropsychiatric variable that is perhaps most relevant to HIV+ persons' quest to return to work. (JINS, 2007, 13, 80–89.)

(Received May 2 2006)
(Revised August 10 2006)
(Accepted August 10 2006)


Key Words: Memory; Employment; Occupational groups; HIV-associated cognitive/motor complex; Cognitive manifestations; Depression.

Correspondence:
c1 Correspondence and reprint requests to: Wilfred G. van Gorp, Ph.D., Columbia Presbyterian Eastside, 16 E. 60th St. Suite 400. New York, New York 10022. E-mail: wv2006@columbia.edu


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