Public Health Nutrition

Research Article

Effects of retirement on lifestyle in relation to changes in weight and waist circumference in Dutch men: a prospective study

Astrid CJ Nooyensa1a2 c1, Tommy LS Visschera1a2, A Jantine Schuita3, Caroline TM van Rossuma4, WM Monique Verschurena1, Willem van Mechelena5 and Jacob C Seidella2

a1 Centre for Prevention and Health Services Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands

a2 Institute of Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit and VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands

a3 Centre for Public Health Forecasting, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands

a4 Centre for Nutrition and Health, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands

a5 Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO Institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Abstract

Objective To study changes in lifestyle in relation to changes in body weight and waist circumference associated with occupational retirement in men.

Design A prospective cohort study with 5 years of follow-up. At baseline and at follow-up, questionnaires were completed and body weight and waist circumference were measured.

Setting The Doetinchem Cohort Study, consisting of inhabitants of Doetinchem, a town in a rural area of The Netherlands.

Subjects In total 288 healthy men aged 50–65 years at baseline, who either remained employed or retired over follow-up.

Results The effect of retirement on changes in weight and waist circumference was dependent on type of former occupation. Increase in body weight and waist circumference was higher among men who retired from active jobs (0.42 kg year−1 and 0.77 cm year−1, respectively) than among men who retired from sedentary jobs (0.08 kg year−1 and 0.23 cm year−1, respectively). Weight gain and increase in waist circumference were associated with a decrease in fruit consumption and fibre density of the diet, with an increase in frequency of eating breakfast, and with a decrease in several physical activities, such as household activities, bicycling, walking and doing odd jobs.

Conclusion Retirement was associated with an increase in weight and waist circumference among those with former active jobs, but not among those with former sedentary jobs. Retirement may bring opportunities for healthy changes in diet and physical activity, which could be used in health promotion programmes.

(Received September 28 2004)

(Accepted May 10 2005)

Correspondence

c1 *Corresponding author: Email astrid.nooyens@falw.vu.nl

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