Public Health Nutrition

Research Article

The stability of soft drinks intake from adolescence to adult age and the association between long-term consumption of soft drinks and lifestyle factors and body weight

Elisabeth Kvaavika1 c1, Lene Frost Andersena1 and Knut-Inge Kleppa1

a1 Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway

Abstract

Objectives To investigate the tracking of sugar-sweetened, carbonated soft drinks intake from age 15 to 33 years and the association between this intake and lifestyle factors and body weight.

Design A longitudinal study with 18–20 years of follow-up. Data about diet, physical activity, smoking and dieting were collected in 1981/1979, 1991 and 1999. Body weight and height were measured in 1981/1979 and self-reported in 1999.

Setting Oslo, Norway.

Subjects Four hundred and twenty-two men and women.

Results Tracking of soft drinks intake from adolescence into early adulthood (age 25 years) and from early adulthood into later adulthood (33 years) was moderate to high, while tracking from adolescence into later adulthood was low. Comparing those reporting a high intake of soft drinks in both 1991 and 1999 with those reporting a low intake at both times, male long-term high consumers were more likely to smoke (48 vs. 21%, P = 0.002) and reported higher intakes of energy (12.2 vs. 10.2 MJ day−1, P = 0.005) and sugar (142 vs. 50 g day−1, P < 0.001) in 1999 than did long-term low consumers. Women high consumers were less likely to be physically active (14 vs. 42%, P = 0.03) and had higher sugar intake (87 vs. 41 g day−1, P < 0.001) in 1999 than did women low consumers. There were no differences in body mass index, overweight or obesity in 1999 between long-term high and low consumers.

Conclusion In this study, stability of soft drinks intake from age 15 to 25 years and from age 25 to 33 years was moderate to high, while from age 15 to 33 years it was low. Soft drinks intake from age 25 to 33 years was associated with smoking and physical inactivity, but not with body weight.

(Received January 07 2004)

(Accepted May 17 2004)

Correspondence

c1 *Corresponding author: Email ekvaavik@medisin.uio.no

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