Epidemiology and Infection

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Epidemiology and Infection (2009), 137:1032-1036 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © 2009 Cambridge University Press
doi:10.1017/S0950268808001842

Short Report

Influenza, Legionnaires' disease and respiratory infections

Human bocavirus respiratory infections in children


T. B. GAGLIARDIa1 c1, M. A. IWAMOTOa1, F. E. PAULAa1, J. L. PROENÇA-MODENAa1, A. M. SARANZOa1, M. F. CRIADOa1, G. O. ACRANIa1, A. A. CAMARAa2, O. A. L. CINTRAa3 and E. ARRUDAa1

a1 Department of Cell Biology, University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
a2 Hospital Santa Lydia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
a3 Department of Pediatrics, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
Article author query
gagliardi tb [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
iwamoto ma [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
paula fe [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
proença-modena jl [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
saranzo am [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
criado mf [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
acrani go [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
camara aa [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
cintra oa [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
arruda e [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]

SUMMARY

Human bocavirus (HBoV) was recently identified in respiratory samples from patients with acute respiratory infections and has been reported in different regions of the world. To the best of our knowledge, HBoV has never been reported in respiratory infections in Brazil. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from patients aged <5 years hospitalized in 2005 with respiratory infections in Ribeirão Preto, southeast Brazil, and tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HBoV. HBoV-positive samples were further tested by PCR for human respiratory syncytial virus, human metapneumovirus, human coronaviruses 229E and OC43, human influenza viruses A and B, human parainfluenza viruses 1, 2 and 3, human rhinovirus and human adenovirus. HBoV was detected in 26/248 (10·5%) children of which 21 (81%) also tested positive for other respiratory viruses. Despite the high rates of co-infections, no significant differences were found between HBoV-positive patients with and without co-infections with regard to symptoms.

(Accepted December 01 2008)

(Online publication January 12 2009)

Key Words:Human bocavirus; parovirus; respiratory viral infections

Correspondence:

c1 Author for correspondence: T. B. Gagliardi, Department of Cell Biology, University of São Paulo School of Medicine (FMRP-USP), Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil, 14049-900. (Email: tbgaglia@usp.br)


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