Epidemiology and Infection

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Epidemiology and Infection (2009), 137:922-931 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © 2008 Cambridge University Press
doi:10.1017/S0950268808001556

Original Papers

Gastroenteritis and rotaviruses

Structured surveillance of infectious intestinal disease in pre-school children in the community: ‘The Nappy Study’


M. ITURRIZA-GÓMARAa1 c1, A. J. ELLIOTa2, C. DOCKERYa1, D. M. FLEMINGa2 and J. J. GRAYa1

a1 Enteric Virus Unit, Health Protection Agency Centre for Infections, London, UK
a2 Birmingham Research Unit of the Royal College of General Practitioners, Birmingham, UK
Article author query
iturriza-gómara m [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
elliot aj [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
dockery c [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
fleming dm [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
gray jj [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]

SUMMARY

The incidence and causes of infectious intestinal disease (IID) in children aged <5 years presenting to general practitioners (GPs) were estimated. During a 12-month period, soiled nappies were collected from children presenting with symptoms suggestive of IID in a network of 65 GPs located across England. Molecular methods were used to detect a range of enteric pathogens including viruses, bacteria and parasites. Genotyping was performed on rotavirus and norovirus isolates. A total of 583 nappies were collected from 554 children; a pathogen was detected in 361 (62%) specimens. In the 43 practices 1584 new episodes of IID were recorded in a population averaging 19774; the specimen capture rate was 28%. IID incidence peaked during March and April. Norovirus (24·5%), rotavirus (19·0%) and sapovirus (12·7%) were most commonly detected, and mixed infections were detected in 11·7% of cases. Strain characterization revealed G1P[8] (65·8%), G4P[4] (8·1%) and G9P[8] (8·1%) as the most common rotavirus genotypes, similar to the UK national distribution. GII-3 (42·9%) and GII-4 (39·7%) were the most common norovirus genotypes; this was significantly different (P<0·005) to the national distribution.

(Accepted October 14 2008)

(Online publication November 19 2008)

Key Words:Burden of disease; children; gastroenteritis; general practice

Correspondence:

c1 Author for correspondence: Dr M. Iturriza-Gómara, Deputy Head, Enteric Virus Unit, Health Protection Agency Centre for Infections, 61 Colindale Avenue, London NW9 5HT, UK. (Email: Miren.Iturriza@hpa.org.uk)


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