Behavioral and Brain Sciences



Author&s Response
Tracey J. Shors & Louis D. Matzel (1997) Long-term potentiation: What's learning got to do with it? BBS 20:597–655

The status of LTP as a mechanism of memory formation in the mammalian brain


Tracey J. Shors a1 and Louis D. Matzel a2
a1 Department of Psychology and Center for Neuroscience, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 07728 shors@rci.rutgers.edu
a2 Department of Psychology, Program in Biopsychology and Behavioral Neuroscience, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 matzel@rci.rutgers.edu

Abstract

Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a long-lasting increase in synaptic efficacy that many consider the best candidate currently available for a neural mechanism of memory formation and/or storage in the mammalian brain. In our target article, LTP: What's learning got to do with it?, we concluded that there was insufficient data to warrant such a conclusion. In their commentaries, Jeffery and Zhadin raise a number of important issues that we did not raise, both for and against the hypothesis. Although we agree with a number of these issues, we maintain that there remains insufficient evidence that LTP is a memory mechanism.



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