Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Cambridge Journals Online - CUP Full-Text Page
Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2009), 32:230-246 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009
doi:10.1017/S0140525X09001186

Authors' Response

Link-based learning theory creates more problems than it solves


Chris J. Mitchella1, Jan De Houwera2 and Peter F. Lovibonda1

a2 Department of Psychology, Ghent University, Henn Dunantlaan 2, B-900, Ghent, Belgium. Jan.dehouwer@ugent.be http://users.ugent.be/~jdhouwer/
Article author query
mitchell cj [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
de houwer j [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
lovibond pf [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]

Abstract

In this response, we provide further clarification of the propositional approach to human associative learning. We explain why the empirical evidence favors the propositional approach over a dual-system approach and how the propositional approach is compatible with evolution and neuroscience. Finally, we point out aspects of the propositional approach that need further development and challenge proponents of dual-system models to specify the systems more clearly so that these models can be tested.

The propositional nature of human associative learning Chris J. Mitchell, Jan De Houwer and Peter F. Lovibond School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Kensington 2052, Australia chris.mitchell@unsw.edu.au http://www.psy.unsw.edu.au/profiles/cmitchell.html; Department of Psychology, Ghent University, Henri Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium jan.dehouwer@ugent.be http://users.ugent.be/~jdhouwer/">; School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Kensington 2052, Australia p.lovibond@unsw.edu.au http://www.psy.unsw.edu.au/profiles/plovibond.html">