Behavioral and Brain Sciences

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Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2009), 32:213-214 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009
doi:10.1017/S0140525X09001022

Open Peer Commentary

Saliences, propositions, and amalgams: Emergent learning in nonhumans


Heidi Lyna1 and Duane M. Rumbaugha2a3

a1 Department of Psychology, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, GA 30030 heidilynphd@aol.com http://userwww.service.emory.edu/~whopkin/Heidipage.html
a3 Language Research Center, Georgia State University, Decatur, GA 30034
Article author query
lyn h [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]
rumbaugh dm [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]

Abstract

We comment on the similarities and differences of Mitchell et al.'s framework for understanding classical and operant conditioning and the theoretical framework put forth by Rumbaugh et al. (2007). We propose that all nonhuman and human learning may be based on amalgams created by co-occurring stimuli that share their response-eliciting properties and that these amalgams may be propositional in nature.

The propositional nature of human associative learning Chris J. Mitchell, Jan De Houwer and Peter F. Lovibond School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Kensington 2052, Australia chris.mitchell@unsw.edu.au http://www.psy.unsw.edu.au/profiles/cmitchell.html; Department of Psychology, Ghent University, Henri Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium jan.dehouwer@ugent.be http://users.ugent.be/~jdhouwer/">; School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Kensington 2052, Australia p.lovibond@unsw.edu.au http://www.psy.unsw.edu.au/profiles/plovibond.html">