Behavioral and Brain Sciences

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Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2009), 32:204-205 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009
doi:10.1017/S0140525X09000922

Open Peer Commentary

Rational models of conditioning


Nick Chatera1

a1 Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom. n.chater@ucl.ac.uk http://www.psychol.ucl.ac.uk/people/profiles/chater_nick.htm
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chater n [PubMed]  [Google Scholar]

Abstract

Mitchell et al. argue that conditioning phenomena may be better explained by high-level, rational processes, rather than by non-cognitive associative mechanisms. This commentary argues that this viewpoint is compatible with neuroscientific data, may extend to nonhuman animals, and casts computational models of reinforcement learning in a new light.

The propositional nature of human associative learning Chris J. Mitchell, Jan De Houwer and Peter F. Lovibond School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Kensington 2052, Australia chris.mitchell@unsw.edu.au http://www.psy.unsw.edu.au/profiles/cmitchell.html; Department of Psychology, Ghent University, Henri Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium jan.dehouwer@ugent.be http://users.ugent.be/~jdhouwer/">; School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Kensington 2052, Australia p.lovibond@unsw.edu.au http://www.psy.unsw.edu.au/profiles/plovibond.html">


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