Behavioral and Brain Sciences

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Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2009), 32:202-203 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009
doi:10.1017/S0140525X09000909

Open Peer Commentary

Learning without thinking


R. A. Boakesa1

a1 School of Psychology (A18), University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. bobb@psych.usyd.edu.au
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Abstract

The main conclusion to draw from Mitchell et al's article is that it is difficult to disentangle cognitive and learning processes in contingency and causal experiments. More compelling evidence for human associate learning comes from research where, because of the type of events involved, participants are unable or unlikely to think about the relationships between the events.

The propositional nature of human associative learning Chris J. Mitchell, Jan De Houwer and Peter F. Lovibond School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Kensington 2052, Australia chris.mitchell@unsw.edu.au http://www.psy.unsw.edu.au/profiles/cmitchell.html; Department of Psychology, Ghent University, Henri Dunantlaan 2, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium jan.dehouwer@ugent.be http://users.ugent.be/~jdhouwer/">; School of Psychology, University of New South Wales, Kensington 2052, Australia p.lovibond@unsw.edu.au http://www.psy.unsw.edu.au/profiles/plovibond.html">