Development and Psychopathology



Diagnostic and measurement issues in the assessment of pediatric bipolar disorder: Implications for understanding mood disorder across the life cycle


ERIC  YOUNGSTROM  a1 c1 , OREN  MEYERS  a2 a3 , JENNIFER KOGOS  YOUNGSTROM  a1 a3 , JOSEPH R.  CALABRESE  a2 and ROBERT L.  FINDLING  a2
a1 University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
a2 Case Western Reserve University
a3 Applewood Centers, Incorporated

Article author query
youngstrom e   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
meyers o   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
youngstrom jk   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
calabrese jr   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
findling rl   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

The goal of this paper is to review assessment research of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. The review addresses numerous themes: the benefits and costs of involving clinical judgment in the diagnostic process, particularly with regard to diagnosis and mood severity ratings; the validity of parent, teacher, and youth self-report of manic symptoms; how much cross-situational consistency is typically shown in mood and behavior; the extent to which a parent's mental health status influences their report of child behavior; how different measures compare in terms of detecting bipolar disorder, the challenges in comparing the performance of measures across research groups, and the leading candidates for research or clinical use; evidence-based strategies for interpreting measures as diagnostic aids; how test performance changes when a test is used in a new setting and what implications this has for research samples as well as clinical practice; the role of family history of mood disorder within an assessment framework; and the implications of assessment research for the understanding of phenomenology of bipolar disorder from a developmental framework. a


Correspondence:
c1 Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Eric Youngstrom, Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, CB 3270, Davie Hall, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; E-mail: eric.youngstrom@unc.edu


Footnotes

a We thank the families who participated in this program of research. This work was supported in part by NIMH R01 MH066647, as well as a Center Grant from the Stanley Medical Research Institute.