Annals of Human Genetics



Sequence variants in the 5′ flanking region of the leptin gene are associated with obesity in women


W.-D. LI a1, D. R. REED a1, J. H. LEE a1, W. XU a1, R. L. KILKER a1, B. R. SODAM a1 and R. ARLEN PRICE a1c1
a1 Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Few mutations have been found in the human leptin gene and the relationship between leptin gene sequence variation and human overweight is uncertain. To determine whether sequence variation within the leptin gene and its regulatory elements contribute to extreme obesity, we screened [similar]3 kb of the 5′ flanking region and the three exons in 125 unrelated extremely obese (BMI [gt-or-equal, slanted] 40 kg/m2) and 86 average weight women (BMI < 27 kg/m2). Within the protein coding regions only one heterozygous silent mutation was found (codon 102; AAC/AAT). Within the 5′ flanking region, six frequent sequence variants were detected (q > 0.10), and the allele frequencies of three of these variants differed between obese and average weight Caucasian women (+19, χ2 = 4.46, p = 0.035; −1823, χ2 = 4.36, p = 0.037; −2548, χ2 = 5.73, p = 0.017). Nine infrequent sequence variants were detected (q < 0.05) but they did not occur more often among obese women compared with those of average-weight. For extremely obese women, three polymorphisms (+19, −188, and −633) predicted the degree of obesity. Allelic variants may influence the regulation of the leptin gene and thereby influence body weight, particularly among extremely obese women. However, given the low variability in coding regions and the high variability in the 5′ flanking region, discerning the functional significance of each variant is likely to be difficult.

(Received December 1 1998)
(Accepted March 26 1999)


Correspondence:
c1 Correspondence: Dr R. Arlen Price, Department of Psychiatry, Center for Neurobiology and Behavior, University of Pennsylvania, One Clinical Research Building, 135b, 415 Curie Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA. Tel: 215-898-0214. Fax: 215-573-2041. E-mail: arlen@bgl.psycha.upenn.edu