Development and Psychopathology



Children's basic memory processes, stress, and maltreatment


MARK L.  HOWE  a1 c1 , DANTE  CICCHETTI  a2 and SHEREE L.  TOTH  a3
a1 Lancaster University
a2 Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota
a3 Mt. Hope Family Center, University of Rochester

Article author query
howe ml   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
cicchetti d   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
toth sl   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

Building upon methods and research utilized with normative populations, we examine extant assumptions regarding the effects of child maltreatment on memory. The effects of stress on basic memory processes is examined, and potential neurobiological changes relevant to memory development are examined. The impact of maltreatment-related sequelae (including dissociation and depression) on basic memory processes as well as false memories and suggestibility are also outlined. Although there is a clear need for additional research, the investigations that do exist reveal that maltreated children's basic memory processes are not reliably different from that of other, nonmaltreated children. a


Correspondence:
c1 Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Mark L. Howe, Department of Psychology, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YF, UK; E-mail: mark.howe@lancaster.ac.uk


Footnotes

a Preparation of this article was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to the authors.