Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics



Alzheimer Testing at Silver Years


A. MATHEW  THOMAS a1, GENE  COHEN a2, ROBERT M.  COOK-DEEGAN a3, JOAN  O'SULLIVAN a4, STEPHEN G.  POST a5, ALLEN D.  ROSES a6, KENNETH F.  SCHAFFNER a7 and RONALD M.  GREEN  a8
a1 Harvard University
a2 Center on Aging, Health, and the Humanities at the George Washington University
a3 National Cancer Policy Board, National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine
a4 University of Maryland Law School
a5 Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Program of the National Human Genome Research Institute and the Center for Biomedical Ethics, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University
a6 Glaxo Wellcome
a7 George Washington University, Washington, D.C.
a8 Ethics Institute at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire

Abstract

Early last year, the GenEthics Consortium (GEC) of the Washington Metropolitan Area convened at George Washington University to consider a complex case about genetic testing for Alzheimer disease (AD). The GEC consists of scientists, bioethicists, lawyers, genetic counselors, and consumers from a variety of institutions and affiliations. Four of the 8 co-authors of this paper delivered presentations on the case. Supplemented by additional ethical and legal observations, these presentations form the basis for the following discussion.



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