Psychological Medicine



Original Article

A controlled longitudinal 5-year follow-up study of children at high and low risk for panic disorder and major depression


JOSEPH BIEDERMAN a1a2c1, CARTER PETTY a1, DINA R. HIRSHFELD-BECKER a1a2, AUDE HENIN a1, STEPHEN V. FARAONE a3, DANIELLE DANG a1, ALEKSANDRA JAKUBOWSKI a1 and JERROLD F. ROSENBAUM a2
a1 Pediatric Psychopharmacology Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
a2 Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
a3 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA

Article author query
biederman j   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
petty c   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
hirshfeld-becker dr   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
henin a   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
faraone sv   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
dang d   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
jakubowski a   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
rosenbaum jf   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

Background. To evaluate the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders in children of parents with panic disorder (PD) and major depression (MD) as they transition through the period of risk from childhood into adolescence.

Method. Over a 5-year follow-up, we compared psychiatric disorders in four groups of children: (1) offspring of parents with PD plus MD (n=136); (2) offspring of parents with PD without MD (n=27); (3) offspring of parents with MD but without PD (n=53); and (4) offspring of non-PD non-MD parents (n=103).

Results. Parental PD was significantly associated with increased risk for anxiety disorders, irrespective of parental MD. Parental MD was associated with increased risk for MD, disruptive behavior disorders, and deficits in psychosocial functioning, irrespective of parental PD.

Conclusions. These longitudinal findings confirm and extend previous cross-sectional results documenting significant associations between PD and MD in parents and patterns of psychopathology and dysfunction in their offspring.

(Published Online May 15 2006)


Correspondence:
c1 Massachusetts General Hospital, Pediatric Psychopharmacology Unit, Yawkey Center for Patient Care-YAW 6A 6900, 32 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA. (Email: jbiederman@partners.org)


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