British Journal of Nutrition

Full Papers

Nutritional Genomics

Human fasting plasma concentrations of vitamin E and carotenoids, and their association with genetic variants in apo C-III, cholesteryl ester transfer protein, hepatic lipase, intestinal fatty acid binding protein and microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein

Patrick Borela1a2a3 c1, Myriam Moussaa1a2a3, Emmanuelle Reboula1a2a3, Bernard Lyana4, Catherine Defoorta1a2a3, Stéphanie Vincent-Baudrya1a2a3, Matthieu Maillota1a2a3, Marguerite Gastaldia1a2a3, Michel Darmona1a2a3, Henri Portugala1a2a3, Denis Lairona1a2a3 and Richard Planellsa1a2a3

a1 INRA, UMR1260 ‘Nutriments Lipidiques et Prévention des Maladies Métaboliques’, F-13385 Marseille, France

a2 INSERM, U476, F-13385 Marseille, France

a3 Université Aix-Marseille 1, Université Aix-Marseille 2, Faculté de Médecine, IPHM-IFR 125, F-13385 Marseille, France

a4 INRA, UMR1019 ‘Nutrition Humaine’, Saint-Genes-Champanelle F-63122, France

Abstract

Plasma concentrations of vitamin E and carotenoids are governed by several factors, including genetic factors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in some genes involved in lipid metabolism have recently been associated with fasting plasma concentrations of these fat-soluble micronutrients. To further investigate the role of genetic factors that modulate the plasma concentrations of these micronutrients, we assessed whether SNP in five candidate genes (apo C-III, CETP, hepatic lipase, I-FABP and MTP) were associated with the plasma concentrations of these micronutrients. Fasting plasma vitamin E and carotenoid concentrations were measured in 129 French Caucasian subjects (forty-eight males and eighty-one females). Candidate SNP were genotyped by PCR amplification followed by restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Plasma γ-tocopherol, α-carotene and β-carotene concentrations were significantly different (P < 0·05) in subjects who carried different SNP variants in hepatic lipase. Plasma α-tocopherol concentrations were significantly different in subjects who had different SNP variants in apo C-III and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). Plasma lycopene concentrations were significantly different (P < 0·05) in women who had different SNP variants in intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP). Finally, there was no effect of SNP variants in microsomal TAG transfer protein upon the plasma concentrations of these micronutrients. Most of the observed differences remained significant after the plasma micronutrients were adjusted for plasma TAG and cholesterol. These results suggest that apo C-III, CETP and hepatic lipase play a role in determining the plasma concentrations of tocopherols while hepatic lipase and I-FABP may modulate plasma concentrations of carotenoids.

(Received February 14 2008)

(Revised June 02 2008)

(Accepted June 11 2008)

(Online publication July 29 2008)

Correspondence:

c1 Corresponding author: Dr Patrick Borel, fax +33 4 91 78 21 01, email patrick.borel@univmed.fr

Footnotes

Abbreviations: CETP, cholesteryl ester transfer protein; HL, hepatic lipase; I-FABP, intestinal fatty acid binding protein; MTP, microsomal TAG transfer protein; SNP, single nucleotide polymorphism

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