Psychological Medicine



Original Article

Race/ethnic differences in the prevalence and co-occurrence of substance use disorders and independent mood and anxiety disorders: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions 1


SHARON M. SMITH a1, FREDERICK S. STINSON a1, DEBORAH A. DAWSON a1, RISE GOLDSTEIN a1, BOJI HUANG a1 and BRIDGET F. GRANT a1c1
a1 Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry, Division of Intramural Clinical and Biological Research, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, USA

Article author query
smith sm   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
stinson fs   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
dawson da   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
goldstein r   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
huang b   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
grant bf   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

Background. Very few large national epidemiologic surveys have examined the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among Asians and Native Americans due to small sample sizes. Very little is also known about the co-occurrences between substance use disorders and mood and anxiety disorders among these two minority groups and how their rates compare to Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics.

Method. Analyses were based on a large (n=43093) nationally representative survey of the adult (18+ years), U.S. population supplemented by a group quarters sampling frame. Prevalences and associations of major DSM-IV mood, anxiety and substance use disorders were examined among all major race/ethnic subgroups of the population.

Results. Twelve-month rates of most mood, anxiety and substance use disorders were generally greatest among Native Americans and lowest among Asians. For most race/ethnic subgroups, alcohol and drug dependence, but not abuse, were significantly associated with mood disorders. With few exceptions, there were no significant associations between alcohol and drug abuse and anxiety disorders. In contrast, alcohol dependence was associated with most anxiety disorders among Whites, Blacks and Asians, but not among Native Americans.

Conclusions. The 12-month prevalence of substance use, mood, and anxiety disorders varied greatly across the five major race/ethnic subgroups of the population. Twelve-month co-occurrence of substance use disorders and mood and anxiety disorders was pervasive among all race/ethnic subgroups. Future research is also needed to understand race/ethnic differentials in prevalence and co-occurrence of these disorders with a particular focus on factors that may give rise to them.


Correspondence:
c1 Laboratory of Epidemiology and Biometry, Room 3077, Division of Intramural Clinical and Biological Research, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, M.S. 9304, 5635 Fishers Lane, Bethesda, MD 20892-9304, USA. (Email: bgrant@willco.niaaa.nih.gov)


Footnotes

1 The views and opinions expressed in this paper are those of the authors and should not be construed to represent the views of sponsoring organizations, agencies, or the U.S. government.



Metrics