Reproductive Medicine Review

Articles

Hormone replacement therapy for osteoporosis: clinical and pathophysiological aspects

JE Compstona1 c1

a1 Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge Clinical School, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK

The pathogenetic role of oestrogen deficiency in osteoporosis was first postulated by Fuller Albright in 1941 and has subsequently become well established. Hormone replacement therapy prevents menopausal bone loss and is the only treatment which has convincingly been shown to reduce fracture risk at both the spine and hip. The mechanisms by which oestrogens affect bone, however, are poorly understood and many aspects of treatment remain ill-defined, in particular with respect to the duration of therapy and its long-term risks and benefits.

Correspondence:

c1 JE Compston, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge Clinical School, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, UK