Journal of Biosocial Science

As this article doesn't contain an abstract, the image below is necessary to enable the article to be indexed by certain search engines. The resolution of the full-text PDF is much higher than that shown here.
Journal of Biosocial Science (2006), 38:3:419-421 Cambridge University Press
Copyright © 2006 Cambridge University Press
doi:10.1017/S0021932005001185

Debate

HOW INTELLECTUAL IS CHESS? – A REPLY TO HOWARD


MERIM  BILALIC  a1 and PETER  McLEOD  a1
a1 University of Oxford, UK

Article author query
bilalic m   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
mcleod p   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

Howard’s (2005) claim that male dominance in chess is ‘consistent with the evolutionary psychology view that males predominate at high achievement levels at least partly because of ability differences’ (p. 378) is based on the premise that top level chess skill depends on a high level of IQ and visuospatial abilities. This premise is not supported by empirical evidence. In 1927 Djakow et al. first showed that world-class chess players do not have exceptional intellectual abilities. This finding has subsequently been confirmed many times. Different participation rates, or differences in the amount of practice, motivation and interest for chess in male and female chess players, may provide a better explanation for gender differences in chess performance.

(Published Online January 27 2006)



null