Development and Psychopathology



REGULAR ARTICLE

Children's coping strategies and coping efficacy: Relations to parent socialization, child adjustment, and familial alcoholism


CYNTHIA L.  SMITH  a1 c1 p1 , NANCY  EISENBERG  a1 p1 , TRACY L.  SPINRAD  a1 , LAURIE  CHASSIN  a1 p1 , AMANDA SHEFFIELD  MORRIS  a1 p2 , ANNE  KUPFER  a1 , JEFFREY  LIEW  a1 p3 , AMANDA  CUMBERLAND  a1 , CARLOS  VALIENTE  a1 and OI-MAN  KWOK  a1 p3
a1 Arizona State University

Article author query
smith cl   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
eisenberg n   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
spinrad tl   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
chassin l   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
morris as   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
kupfer a   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
liew j   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
cumberland a   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
valiente c   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
kwok o   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

The relations of children's coping strategies and coping efficacy to parent socialization and child adjustment were examined in a sample of school-age children that included families in which some of the grandparents and/or parents had an alcoholism diagnosis. Parents and older children reported on the children's coping strategies; parents reported on their parenting behavior; and teachers reported on children's externalizing and internalizing problems. Measures of parent socialization were associated with parents' and children's reports of active coping strategies and parents' reports of both support-seeking coping and coping efficacy. Some of these relations were moderated by familial alcohol status. Children higher in parent-reported active/support-seeking coping and coping efficacy were rated lower in teacher-reported externalizing and internalizing adjustment problems. The findings were consistent with the view that active/support-seeking coping and coping efficacy mediated the association of parent socialization to children's psychological adjustment and that this relation was sometimes moderated by parental alcohol status. a


Correspondence:
c1 Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Cynthia L. Smith, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Human Development, 366 Wallace Hall (0416), Blacksburg, VA 24061; E-mail: smithcl@vt.edu
p1 Cynthia L. Smith is now at the Department of Human Development, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
p2 Amanda Sheffield Morris is now at the Department of Psychology, University of New Orleans
p3 Jeffrey Liew and Oi-man Kwok are now at the Department of Educational Psychology, Texas A&M University


Footnotes

a This research was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Drug Abuse (DA05227; Laurie Chassin, Principle Investigator, Nancy Eisenberg, Co-Principal Investigator).