Journal of Fluid Mechanics



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Fully resolved simulations of particle-turbulence interaction


TRISTAN M. BURTON a1 and JOHN K. EATON a2
a1 Mechanical Engineering Department, US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 21402, USA
a2 Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA

Article author query
burton tm   [Google Scholar] 
eaton jk   [Google Scholar] 
 

Abstract

The interaction between a fixed particle and decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence is studied numerically using an overset grid that provides resolution of all scales of fluid motion. A description of the numerical technique and validation of the solution procedure are presented. An ensemble of 64 simulations with the particle in different regions of the flow is computed. The particle diameter in the simulations is approximately twice the size of the unladen Kolmogorov length scale, and the maximum value of the particle Reynolds numbers due to the turbulent fluctuations is close to 20. Ensemble averages of quantities from the numerical solutions are used to investigate the turbulence modification and the fluid forces on the particle. Volume-averaged profiles of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate from the overset grid simulations reveal that the displacement of fluid by the particle and the formation of the boundary layer at the particle surface lead to turbulence modification in a local region. Time histories of the force applied to the particle from each overset grid simulation are compared to those predicted by a particle equation of motion. The particle equation of motion is shown to underpredict the root mean square (RMS) force applied to the particle by the turbulence. RMS errors between the forces from the overset grid simulation and those predicted by the particle equation of motion are shown to be between 15% and 30% of the RMS force on the particle. The steady viscous drag force is shown to be the dominant term in the particle equation of motion while the history integral term is negligible.

(Published Online December 2 2005)
(Received November 5 2004)
(Revised June 6 2005)



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