Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society



Neurological, neuropsychological, and functional outcome following treatment for unruptured intracranial aneurysms


KARREN  TOWGOOD  a1 c1 , JENNI A.  OGDEN  a1 and EDWARD  MEE  a2
a1 Department of Psychology, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
a2 Department of Neurosurgery, Auckland Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand

Article author query
towgood k   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
ogden ja   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
mee e   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

The objective of this study was to carry out a detailed investigation of the neurological, neuropsychological, and return-to-work status of treatment for unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs). A prospective design was used to evaluate the outcome of UIA treatment in a group of 26 UIA patients. Over a 24-month period UIA patients were assessed prior to treatment, during hospitalization, at three months and at six months following treatment. Their performance was compared to a group of 20 matched controls. Neurological morbidity as a result of the UIA treatment was 5%, as assessed by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) or Rankin at 3 months. The Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS) proved to be unreliable as a measure of cognitive change. Reliability of change analysis was more sensitive than group analysis, and revealed a pattern of cognitive deficits in 10% of patients as a result of the UIA treatment. In addition, 25% of patients reported a change in work role as a result of the UIA treatment. While 10% of patients sustained mild to moderate neurological and cognitive impairments 3 to 6 months following UIA treatment, their deficits were not as wide-ranging nor as severe as those sustained by patients who survive a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). (JINS, 2005, 11, 522–534.)

(Received September 7 2004)
(Revised May 15 2005)
(Accepted May 19 2005)


Key Words: Change; Cognitive; Deficits; Morbidity; Prospective; SAH.

Correspondence:
c1 Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Karren Towgood, Ph.D., Middlemore Hospital, Private Bag 93311, Otahuhu, Auckland, New Zealand. E-mail: karren.towgood@middlemore.co.nz