Behavioral and Brain Sciences



Open Peer Commentary
Aggleton & Brown: Episodic memory, amnesia, and hippocampus

Episodic memory: It's about time (and space)


Lynn Nadel a1, Lee Ryan a1, Katrina Keil a1 and Karen Putnam a1
a1 Department of Psychology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 {nadel; ryant; keil; kputnam}@u.arizona.edu

Abstract

Aggleton & Brown rightly point out the shortcomings of the medial temporal lobe hypothesis as an approach to anterograde amnesia. Their broader perspective is a necessary corrective, and one hopes it will be taken very seriously. Although they correctly note the dangers of conflating recognition and recall, they themselves make a similar mistake in discussing familiarity; we suggest an alternative approach. We also discuss implications of their view for an analysis of retrograde amnesia. The notion that there are two routes by which the hippocampus can reactivate neuronal ensembles in the neocortex could help us understand some currently puzzling facts about the dynamics of memory consolidation.



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