Behavioral and Brain Sciences



Open Peer Commentary
Caplan & Waters: Working memory and sentence comprehension

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John N. Towse a1, Graham J. Hitch a2 and Una Hutton a3
a1 Royal Holloway University of London, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX United Kingdom j.towse@rhbnc.ac.uk
a2 Department of Psychology, University of Lancaster, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YF United Kingdom ghitch@lancaster.ac.uk
a3 Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham, Surrey, TW20 0EX United Kingdom u.hutton@rhbnc.ac.uk www.pc.rhbnc.ac.uk/jt/jt.html

Abstract

Working memory span forms an important cornerstone of current accounts of cognition, and cognitive development. We describe data that challenge the conventional interpretation of span as a measure of working memory capacity. We argue that the implications of these data undermine the analysis provided by Caplan & Waters concerning the role of working memory in sentence comprehension.