Behavioral and Brain Sciences



Open Peer Commentary
Dienes & Perner: Implicit and explicit knowledge

Explicit representations in hypothetical thinking


Jonathan St. B. T. Evans a1 and David E. Over a2
a1 Centre for Thinking and Language, Department of Psychology, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, PL4 8AA, United Kingdom j.evans@plym.ac.uk
a2 School of Social and International Studies, University of Sunderland, Sunderland SRI, United Kingdom david.over@sunderland.ac.uk

Abstract

Dienes' & Perner's proposals are discussed in relation to the distinction between explicit and implicit systems of thinking. Evans and Over (1996) propose that explicit processing resources are required for hypothetical thinking, in which mental models of possible world states are constructed. Such thinking requires representations in which the individuals' propositional attitudes including relevant beliefs and goals are made fully explicit.