Social Philosophy and Policy

Research Article

Hypothetical Consent in Kantian Constructivism*

Thomas E. Hill Jra1

a1 Philosophy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Epistemology, as I understand it, is a branch of philosophy especially concerned with general questions about how we can know various things or at least justify our beliefs about them. It questions what counts as evidence and what are reasonable sources of doubt. Traditionally, episte-mology focuses on pervasive and apparently basic assumptions covering a wide range of claims to knowledge or justified belief rather than very specific, practical puzzles. For example, traditional epistemologists ask “How do we know there are material objects?” and not “How do you know which are the female beetles?” Similarly, moral epistemology, as I understand it, is concerned with general questions about how we can know or justify our beliefs about moral matters. Its focus, again, is on quite general, pervasive, and apparently basic assumptions about what counts as evidence, what are reasonable sources of doubt, and what are the appropriate procedures for justifying particular moral claims.

Footnotes

* I am grateful to Andrews Reath, Shelly Kagan, Philip Pettit, Thomas Pogge, David Copp, Geoffrey Sayre-McCord, and David Brink for helpful comments on earlier drafts of this essay.

Metrics