European Journal of Anaesthesiology



Original Article

Anaesthesia for day case surgery: a survey of paediatric clinical practice in the UK


K. Payne a1c1, E. W. Moore a2, R. A. Elliott a1, J. K. Moore a2 and G. A. McHugh a3
a1 University of Manchester, School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manchester, UK
a2 Wirral Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Anaesthesia, Wirral, UK
a3 University of Manchester, School of Nursing, Midwifery & Health Visiting, Manchester, UK

Article author query
payne k   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
moore ew   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
elliott ra   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
moore jk   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
mchugh ga   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Summary

Background and objective: In October 2000, we conducted a national postal survey of day case consultant anaesthetists in the UK to explore the range and variation in practice of anaesthetizing a patient for day case surgery (paediatrics, urology and orthopaedics). This paper reports the findings of this national survey of paediatric day case anaesthetic practice carried out as part of a major two-centre randomized controlled trial designed to investigate the costs and outcome of several anaesthetic techniques during day care surgery in paediatric and adult patients (cost-effectiveness study of anaesthesia in day case surgery).

Methods: The survey used a structured postal questionnaire and collected data on the duration of surgical procedure; the use of premedication; the anaesthetic agents used for induction and maintenance; the fresh gas flow rates used for general anaesthesia; the use of antiemetics; and the administration of local anaesthesia and analgesia.

Results: The overall response rate for the survey was 74 and 63% for the paediatric section of the survey. Respondents indicated that 19% used premedication, 63% used propofol for induction, 54% used isoflurane for maintenance, 24% used prophylactic antiemetics and 85% used a laryngeal mask. The findings of this national survey are discussed and compared with published evidence.

Conclusions: This survey identifies the variation in clinical practice in paediatric day surgery anaesthesia in the UK.

(Accepted June 2002)


Key Words: AGE GROUPS, child; ANAESTHESIA, GENERAL; ANALGESIA; PATIENT CARE, day care; POSTOPERATIVE NAUSEA AND VOMITING; SURGICAL PROCEDURES, OPERATIVE, perioperative care.

Correspondence:
c1 Correspondence to: Katherine Payne, School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK. E-mail: katherine.payne@man.ac.uk; Tel: +44 (0)161 276 5385; Fax: +44 (0)161 275 2416