Visual Neuroscience


International Colour Vision Society 2003 Symposium

Infants' spontaneous color preferences are not due to adult-like brightness variations


DAVIDA Y.  TELLER  a1 c1 , ANDREA  CIVAN  a2 and KEVIN  BRONSON-CASTAIN  a2
a1 Departments of Psychology and Physiology/Biophysics, University of Washington, Seattle
a2 Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle

Article author query
teller dy   [Google Scholar] 
civan a   [Google Scholar] 
bronson-castain k   [Google Scholar] 
 

Abstract

In the present work, we explore the perceptual bases of infants' spontaneous looking preferences among isoluminant chromatic stimuli (Bornstein, 1975). Three experiments were conducted. In Experiment 1, adult subjects made brightness matches between a white standard and each of six isoluminant chromatic stimuli. The classic variations of brightness with chromaticity were found. In Experiment 2, 12-week-old infants' spontaneous looking preferences were measured for white lights of different luminances. Preference increased with increasing luminance, suggesting that brightness differences are sufficient to create looking preferences among isochromatic stimuli. In Experiment 3, infants' preferences were tested for each of the six chromatic stimuli paired against white, at both isoluminance and (adult) isobrightness. All chromatic stimuli were preferred to white, and the pattern of preferences was similar for both isoluminance and isobrightness conditions. It is concluded that hue and/or saturation, rather than brightness, control infants' spontaneous looking preferences among chromatic stimuli.

(Received September 7 2003)
(Accepted February 9 2004)


Key Words: Infant color vision; Infant color preferences; Infant brightness perception.

Correspondence:
c1 Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Davida Y. Teller, Department of Psychology, Box 351525, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1525, USA. E-mail: dteller@u.washington.edu