Journal of Fluid Mechanics



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Shear-induced self-diffusion and microstructure in non-Brownian suspensions at non-zero Reynolds numbers


JANNEKE KROMKAMP a1a2, DIRK T. M. VAN DEN ENDE a3, DRONA KANDHAI a4, RUUD G. M. VAN DER SMAN a1 and REMKO M. BOOM a1
a1 Food and Bioprocess Engineering Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
a2 Corporate Research, Friesland Foods BV, Deventer, The Netherlands
a3 Science and Technology, University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands
a4 Kramers Laboratorium voor Fysische Technologie, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands

Article author query
kromkamp j   [Google Scholar] 
van den ende dt   [Google Scholar] 
kandhai d   [Google Scholar] 
van der sman rg   [Google Scholar] 
boom rm   [Google Scholar] 
 

Abstract

This paper addresses shear-induced self-diffusion in a monodisperse suspension of non-Brownian particles in Couette flow by two-dimensional computer simulations following the lattice-Boltzmann method. This method is suited for the study of (many-particle) particulate suspensions and can not only be applied for Stokes flow, but also for flow with finite Reynolds number. At relatively low shear particle Reynolds numbers (up to 0.023), shear-induced diffusivity exhibited a linear dependence on the shear rate, as expected from theoretical considerations. Simulations at shear particle Reynolds numbers between 0.023 and 0.35, however, revealed that in this regime, shear-induced diffusivity did not show this linear dependence anymore. Instead, the diffusivity was found to increase more than linearly with the shear rate, an effect that was most pronounced at lower area fractions of 0.10 and 0.25. In the same shear regime, major changes were found in the flow trajectories of two interacting particles in shear flow (longer and closer approach) and in the viscosity of the suspension (shear thickening). Moreover, the suspended particles exhibited particle clustering. The increase of shear-induced diffusivity is shown to be directly correlated with this particle clustering. As for shear-induced diffusivity, the effect of increasing shear rates on particle clustering was the most intensive at low area fractions of 0.10 and 0.25, where the radius of the clusters increased from about 4 to about 7 particle radii with an increase of the shear Reynolds number from 0.023 to 0.35. The importance of particle clustering to shear-induced diffusion might also indicate the importance of other factors that can induce particle clustering, such as, for example, colloidal instability.

(Published Online April 1 2005)
(Received June 30 2003)
(Revised October 15 2004)



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