Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society



Florida Cognitive Activities Scale: Initial development and validation


JOHN A.  SCHINKA  a1 a2 c1 , ANGELA  MCBRIDE  a2 , RODNEY D.  VANDERPLOEG  a2 a3 , KAREN  TENNYSON  a1 , AMY R.  BORENSTEIN  a4 and JAMES A.  MORTIMER  a4
a1 James A. Haley VA Medical Center, Tampa
a2 Department of Psychiatry, University of South Florida, Tampa
a3 Department of Psychiatry, University of South Florida, Tampa
a4 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Florida, Tampa

Article author query
schinka ja   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
mcbride a   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
vanderploeg rd   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
tennyson k   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
borenstein ar   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
mortimer ja   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

We used a rational-empirical approach in the construction and validation of a cognitive activity scale for use with elderly populations. The scale development effort produced a 25-item scale with a reasonably high level of internal consistency in a sample of 200 elderly individuals. Scale scores were positively correlated with years of education and measures of various domains of cognitive ability. In a separate cross-validation sample, a similar pattern of reliability and validity coefficients was obtained. The full scale score was found to contribute significantly to the prediction of cognitive ability after controlling for the effects of age, education, and gender. Two subscales (Higher Cognitive Abilities and Frequent Cognitive Abilities) and a measure of self-reported maintenance of cognitive activity were also developed. In a separate study, the maintenance score was found to differ significantly between the validation sample and a sample of individuals with a history of neurological disorder, with a moderate effect size (d approximately = .7). Further cross-validation studies in minority groups and groups of varying socioeconomic status will be critical in establishing the research and clinical value of the scale and subscales. (JINS, 2005, 11, 108–116.)

(Received April 28 2004)
(Revised October 19 2004)
(Accepted October 20 2004)


Key Words: Cognition; Aging; Activity level; Neuropsychology.

Correspondence:
c1 Reprint requests to: John A. Schinka, Ph.D., Haley VA Medical Center/116B, 13000 B.B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, FL 33612. E-mail: jschinka@hsc.usf.edu