International Psychogeriatrics


Canadian Study of Health and Aging
DERIVED VARIABLES FOR THE CSHA

Measuring Psychological Well-Being in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging


Philippa J. Clarke a1, Victor W. Marshall a2, Carol D. Ryff a3 and Blair Wheaton a4
a1 Institute for Human Development, Life Course and Aging, and Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto
a2 University of North Carolina Institute on Aging, and Department of Sociology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
a3 Department of Psychology, and Institute on Aging, University of Wisconsin-Madison
a4 Institute for Human Development, Life Course and Aging, and Departments of Sociology and Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto.

Article author query
clarke p   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
marshall v   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
ryff c   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
wheaton b   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

The Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CHSA) provided an opportunity to examine the positive aspects of aging. CHSA-2 included the 18-item Ryff multidimensional measure of well-being, which taps six core theoretical dimensions of positive psychological functioning. The measure was administered to 4,960 seniors without severe cognitive impairment or dementia at CSHA-2. Intercorrelations across scales were generally low. At the same time, the internal consistency reliability of each of the 6 subscales was not found to be high. Confirmatory factor analyses provide support for a 6-factor model, although some items demonstrate poor factor loadings. The well-being measures in CSHA-2 provide an opportunity to examine broad, descriptive patterns of well-being in Canadian seniors.