International Psychogeriatrics



Studies on Dementia

Mnemonics Usage and Cognitive Decline in Age-Associated Memory Impairment


Gary W. Small a1a2a3, Asenath La Rue a1a4, Scott Komo a1 and Andrea Kaplan a1
a1 Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA
a2 Center on Aging, University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA
a3 Veterans Affairs Medical Center, West Los Angeles, California, USA
a4 Department of Psychiatry, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA

Article author query
small g   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
la rue a   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
komo s   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
kaplan a   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

To determine predictors of cognitive deterioration, the authors performed baseline and 1- to 5-year follow-up (mean ± SD = 2.5 ± 1.2 years) neuropsychological assessments on 36 persons (mean age ± SD = 62.1 ± 8.0; range = 50 to 81 years) with age-associated memory impairment. Subjects were recruited from a larger group of volunteers, had minimal medical comorbidity, and 25 of them had a family history of Alzheimer's disease. Baseline age and a subjective memory measure indicating reported frequency of mnemonics usage were significant decline predictors. Subjects reporting more frequent mnemonics use at baseline were more likely to show objective cognitive decline at follow-up. Baseline full-scale IQ, educational level, and family history of Alzheimer's disease failed to predict decline. These findings suggest that although age is the strongest decline predictor in some people with age-associated memory impairment, self-perception of memory function may also predict subsequent cognitive loss.