Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union


The Interplay among Black Holes, Stars and ISM Galactic Nuclei
INVITED LECTURES

The infrared universe: The cosmic evolution of superstarbursts and massive black holes


D. B. Sanders a1, C. M. Ishida a2, J. M. Mazzarella a3, S. Veilleux a4, J. A. Surace a5, O. Guyon a2, J. B. Jensen a6 and D.-C. Kim a7p1
a1 Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA email: sanders@ifa.hawaii.edu
a2 Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720, USA email: cat@subaru.naoj.org, guyon@subaru.naoj.org
a3 Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Mail Stop 100-22, California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125, USA email: mazz@ipac.caltech.edu
a4 Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA email: veilleux@astro.umd.edu
a5 Spitzer Science Center, Mail Stop 314-6, California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125, USA email: jason@ipac.caltech.edu
a6 Gemini Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 87519, USA email: jjensen@gemini.edu
a7 School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (BK21), Soeul National University, Soeul, Korea email: dckim@astro.snu.ac.kr

Article author query
sanders db   [Google Scholar] 
ishida cm   [Google Scholar] 
mazzarella jm   [Google Scholar] 
veilleux s   [Google Scholar] 
surace ja   [Google Scholar] 
guyon o   [Google Scholar] 
jensen jb   [Google Scholar] 
kim d   [Google Scholar] 
 
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Abstract

Our view of galaxy evolution has been dramatically enhanced by recent deep field surveys at far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Current evidence suggests that the number density of the most luminous far-infrared sources evolves strongly with redshift, and that the luminosity density in the far-infrared/submillimeter may exceed that in the optical/ultraviolet by factors of 3−10 at redshifts z > 1. If true, then as much as 80-90% of the “activity” in galaxies at z > 1 may be hidden by dust. Surveys of complete samples of luminous infrared galaxies in the local Universe show that the majority, if not all objects with log $(L_{\rm ir}/L_\odot) \simgt 11.6$, appear to be major mergers of molecular gas-rich disks accompanied by dust-enshrouded nuclear starbursts and powerful AGN. If the majority of the deep-field sources are simply more distant analogs of local luminous infrared galaxies, then we may be witnessing at z [similar]1−3 the primary epoch in the formation of spheroids and massive black holes. This major event in galaxy evolution is largely missed by current deep optical/ultraviolet surveys.


Correspondence:
p1 Present address: Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA


Footnotes

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