Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society

Symposium

Frontal contributions to face processing differences in autism: Evidence from fMRI of inverted face processing

SUSAN Y. BOOKHEIMERa1a2 c1, A. TING WANGa3, ASHLEY SCOTTa1, MARIAN SIGMANa1a2 and MIRELLA DAPRETTOa1

a1 Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

a2 Department of Psychology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California

a3 Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York

Abstract

Functional neuroimaging studies of face processing deficits in autism have typically focused on visual processing regions, such as the fusiform face area (FFA), which have shown reduced activity in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), though inconsistently. We recently reported reduced activity in the inferior frontal region in ASD, implicating impaired mirror-neuron systems during face processing. In the present study, we used fMRI during a face processing task in which subjects had to match faces presented in the upright versus inverted position. Typically developing (TD) children showed a classic behavioral inversion effect, increased reaction time for inverted faces, while this effect was significantly reduced in ASD subjects. The fMRI data showed similar responses in the fusiform face area for ASD and TD children, with both groups demonstrating increased activation for inverted faces. However, the groups did differ in several brain regions implicated in social cognition, particularly prefrontal cortex and amygdala. These data suggest that the behavioral differences in processing upright versus inverted faces for TD children are related not to visual information processing but to the social significance of the stimuli. Our results are consistent with other recent studies implicating frontal and limbic dysfunction during face processing in autism. (JINS, 2008, 14, 922–932.)

(Received January 08 2008)

(Revised August 09 2008)

(Accepted August 11 2008)

Correspondence:

c1 Correspondence and reprint requests to: Susan Y. Bookheimer, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, 760 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095. E-mail: sbook@ucla.edu