Journal of Biosocial Science

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Regular Articles

UNINTENDED PREGNANCY AND WOMEN’S PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING IN INDONESIA


KAREN  HARDEE  a1 , ELIZABETH  EGGLESTON  a2 , EMELITA L.  WONG  a3 , IRWANTO  a4 and TERENCE H.  HULL  a5
a1 The POLICY Project, The Futures Group, Washington DC
a2 RTI International, Washington DC
a3 Family Health International, North Carolina, USA
a4 Centre for Societal Development Studies, Atma Jaya Catholic University, Jakarta, Indonesia
a5 Demography and Sociology Program, Australian National University

Article author query
hardee k   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
eggleston e   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
wong el   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
irwanto ?   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
hull th   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

Few studies have examined the impact of unintended pregnancy on women in developing countries. This paper examines the impact of unintended pregnancy on Indonesian women’s psychological well-being. It is hypothesized that experiencing unintended pregnancy is associated with lower psychological well-being and that use of family planning and small family size are associated with higher levels of psychological well-being. Data are drawn from a 1996 survey of 796 women aged 15–49 from two Indonesian provinces, Lampung and South Sumatra. This article focuses on the 71% of women (n=562) who answered all 41 survey items related to psychological well-being. In cluster analysis, women grouped into three clusters, differentiated by their scores on four scales of well-being established through factor analysis (general negative feelings, satisfaction with relationships, satisfaction with economic/family/personal conditions, and negative feelings regarding domestic issues). Women in cluster 3 were characterized mainly by their high level of psychological well-being. Women in cluster 1 had the lowest level of well-being, and women in cluster 2 were in the middle. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess jointly the effect of unintended pregnancy, contraceptive use, number of children and other factors on a woman’s level of psychological well-being. Unintended pregnancy was associated with lower levels of psychological well-being and contraceptive use was associated with higher levels of psychological well-being, while number of children was not associated with level of well-being. Women who had experienced an unintended pregnancy were less likely to be in the high psychosocial well-being cluster versus both the medium and low clusters. In addition, women using contraception were more likely to be classified in the high than in the low or medium well-being clusters.