Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society



Context-specific memory and apolipoprotein E (ApoE) [varepsilon]4: Cognitive evidence from the NIMH prospective study of risk for Alzheimer's disease


JAMES A.  LEVY  a1 c1 , JUDY  BERGESON  a1 , KAREN  PUTNAM  a1 , VIRGINIA  ROSEN  a1 , ROBERT  COHEN  a1 , FRANCOIS  LALONDE  a1 , NADEEM  MIRZA  a1 , GARY  LINKER  a1 and TREY  SUNDERLAND  a1
a1 Geriatric Psychiatry Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland

Article author query
levy ja   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
bergeson j   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
putnam k   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
rosen v   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
cohen r   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
lalonde f   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
mirza n   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
linker g   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
sunderland t   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

The aim of the study was to determine whether the [varepsilon]4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene was associated primarily with context-specific memory among individuals at genetic risk for developing Alzheimer's disease. The effect of ApoE status on comprehensive neuropsychological results was examined in 176 healthy adults during baseline cognitive testing in the NIMH Prospective Study of Biomarkers for Older Controls at Risk for Alzheimer's Disease (NIMH Prospective BIOCARD Study). The presence of the [varepsilon]4 allele was associated with significantly lower total scores on the Logical Memory II subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale–Revised and percent of information retained after delay. Further analysis indicated the prose recall and retention effect was partially explained by a small subgroup of [varepsilon]4 homozygotes, suggesting a gradually progressive process that may be presaged with specific cognitive measures. The current results may represent an [varepsilon]4-associated breakdown between gist-related information and context-bound veridical recall. This relative disconnection may be understood in light of putative [varepsilon]4-related preclinical accumulation of Alzheimer pathology (tangles and plaques) in the entorhinal cortex (EC) and among frontal networks, as well as the possibility of less-efficient compensatory strategies. (JINS, 2004, 10, 362–370.)

(Received December 18 2002)
(Revised September 5 2003)
(Accepted September 8 2003)


Key Words: Alzheimer risk; Context-specific memory; Apolipoprotein E.

Correspondence:
c1 Address correspondence and reprint requests to: James A. Levy, National Institute of Mental Health, Geriatric Psychiatry Branch, 9000 Rockville Pike, Building 10-3N228, MSC 1275, Bethesda, MD 20892. E-mail: jameslevy@mail.nih.gov