International Psychogeriatrics



Use of medications to enhance memory in a large community sample of 60–64 year olds


Anthony F. Jorm a1c1, Bryan Rodgers a1 and Helen Christensen a1a2
a1 Epidemiologist, Centre for Mental Health Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
a2 Psychologist, Centre for Mental Health Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

Article author query
jorm a   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
rodgers b   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
christensen h   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

Background: There are no existing epidemiological data on use of medications to enhance memory.

Method: A community survey was carried out in Canberra and Queanbeyan, Australia, of an electoral roll sample of 2551 adults aged 60–64 years. Data collected included self-reports of using medications to enhance memory, tests of memory and other cognitive functions, anxiety, depression, physical health and use of other medications.

Results: 2.8% of the sample reported using medications to enhance memory, the main ones being gingko biloba, vitamin E, bacopa (brahmi), and folic acid/B vitamins. Users were more likely to be female, to have subjective memory problems and to use other psychotropic medications. However, they did not differ in memory performance, anxiety, depression or physical health.

Discussion: Some older people are using complementary medications to improve their memory or prevent memory loss, despite the lack of strong evidence for their effectiveness. These people show no objective evidence of memory impairment

(Received July 24 2003)
(Returned to authors for revision August 15 2003)
(Revised version received August 29 2003)
(Accepted August 30 2003)


Key Words: complementary medications; memory enhancement; random sample.

Correspondence:
c1 Address for correspondence: A. F. Jorm, Centre for Mental Health Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia. Phone: +61 2 61258414; Fax: +61 2 61250733. E-mail: Anthony.Jorm@anu.edu.au