Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Open Peer Commentary

Addiction: More than innate rationality

Daniel H. Lendea1

a1 Department of Anthropology, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556. dlende@nd.edu http://neuroanthropology.wordpress.com/

Abstract

Redish et al. rely too much on a rational and innate view of decision-making, when their emphasis on variation, their integrative spirit, and their neuroscientific insights point towards a broader view of why addiction is such a tenacious problem. The integration of subjective, sociocultural, and evolutionary factors with cognitive neuroscience advances our understanding of addiction and decision-making.

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    A unified framework for addiction: Vulnerabilities in the decision process A. David Redish, Steve Jensen and Adam Johnson Department of Neuroscience, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 redish@umn.edu http://umn.edu/~redish/; Graduate Program in Computer Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 jens0491@umn.edu; Graduate Program in Neuroscience and Center for Cognitive Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 john5726@umn.edu
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