Behavioral and Brain Sciences

Open Peer Commentary

The role of motor-sensory feedback in the evolution of mind

Bruce Bridgemana1

a1 Department of Psychology, School of Social Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064. bruceb@ucsc.edu http://people.ucsc.edu/~b ruceb/

Abstract

Seemingly small changes in brain organization can have revolutionary consequences for function. An example is evolution's application of the primate action-planning mechanism to the management of communicative sequences. When feedback from utterances reaches the brain again through a mechanism that evolved to monitor action sequences, it makes another pass through the brain, amplifying the human power of thinking.

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