Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society



Regional atrophy of the corpus callosum in dementia


BRADLEY J.  HALLAM  a1 a8 , WARREN S.  BROWN  a1 c1 , CHRIS  ROSS  a1 , J. GALEN  BUCKWALTER  a1 a2 , ERIN D.  BIGLER  a3 a4 , JOANN T.  TSCHANZ  a5 , MARIA C.  NORTON  a5 , KATHLEEN A.  WELSH-BOHMER  a6 and JOHN C.S.  BREITNER  a7 a
a1 The Travis Research Institute, Center for Biopsychosocial Research, Fuller Graduate School of Psychology, Pasadena, California
a2 Research and Development, eHarmony, Pasadena, California
a3 Departments of Psychology and Neuroscience, Brain Imaging & Behavior Laboratory, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah
a4 Utah Brain Institute and Department of Psychiatry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah
a5 Department of Psychology & Center for Epidemiologic Studies, Utah State University, Logan, Utah
a6 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and the Joseph and Kathleen Bryan Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
a7 VA Puget Sound Health Care System and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington
a8 Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Article author query
hallam bj   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
brown ws   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
ross c   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
buckwalter jg   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
bigler ed   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
tschanz 4j   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
norton mc   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
welsh-bohmer ka   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
breitner jc   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

Abstract

The regional distribution of degeneration of the corpus callosum (CC) in dementia is not yet clear. This study compared regional CC size in participants (n = 179) from the Cache County Memory and Aging Study. Participants represented a range of cognitive function: Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), mild ambiguous (MA–cognitive problems, but not severe enough for diagnosis of dementia), and healthy older adults. CC outlines obtained from midsagittal magnetic resonance images were divided into 99 equally spaced widths. Factor analysis of these callosal widths identified 10 callosal regions. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed significant group differences for anterior and posterior callosal regions. Post-hoc pairwise comparisons of CC regions in patient groups as compared to the control group (controlling for age) revealed trends toward smaller anterior and posterior regions, but not all were statistically significant. As compared to controls, significantly smaller anterior and posterior CC regions were found in the AD group; significantly smaller anterior CC regions in the VaD group; but no significant CC regional differences in the MA group. Findings suggest that dementia-related CC atrophy occurs primarily in the anterior and posterior portions. (JINS, 2008, 14, 414–423.)

(Received March 20 2007)
(Revised December 21 2007)
(Accepted December 24 2007)


Key Words: Alzheimer's disease; Vascular dementia; Corpus callosum; Neurodegenerative diseases; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Mild cognitive impairment; MRI morphology; Corpus callosum regions; Brain atrophy; White matter degeneration.

Correspondence:
c1 Correspondence and reprint requests to: Warren S. Brown, Ph.D., The Travis Research Institute, 180 N. Oakland Ave., Pasadena, CA 91101. E-mail: wsbrown@fuller.edu


Footnotes

a FOR THE CACHE COUNTY INVESTIGATORS



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