Visual Neuroscience



Location, architecture, and retinotopy of the anteromedial lateral suprasylvian visual area (AMLS) of the ferret (Mustela putorius)


PAUL R.  MANGER  a1 c1 , GERHARD  ENGLER  a2 , CHRISTIAN K.E.  MOLL  a2 and ANDREAS K.  ENGEL  a2
a1 School of Anatomical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Republic of South Africa
a2 University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Centre of Experimental Medicine, Department of Neurophysiology and Pathophysiology, Hamburg, Germany

Article author query
manger pr   [Google Scholar] 
engler g   [Google Scholar] 
moll ck   [Google Scholar] 
engel ak   [Google Scholar] 
 

Abstract

The present paper describes the results of architectural and electrophysiological mapping observations of the medial bank of the suprasylvian sulcus of the ferret immediately caudal to somatosensory regions. The aim was to determine if the ferret possessed a homologous cortical area to the anteromedial lateral suprasylvian visual area (AMLS) of the domestic cat. We studied the architectural features and visuotopic organization of a region that we now consider to be a homologue to the cat AMLS. This area showed a distinct architecture and retinotopic organization. The retinotopic map was complex in nature with a bias towards representation of the lower visual field. These features indicate that the region described here as AMLS in the ferret is indeed a direct homologue of the previously described cat AMLS and forms part of a hierarchy of cortical areas processing motion in the ferret visual cortex. With the results of the present study and those of earlier studies a total of twelve cortical visual areas have been determined presently for the ferret, all of which appear to have direct homologues with visual cortical areas in the cat (which has a total of eighteen areas).

(Received August 9 2007)
(Accepted November 6 2007)


Key Words: Visual cortex; Carnivora; Cortical maps; Cerebral cortex; Evolution.

Correspondence:
c1 Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Paul Manger, School of Anatomical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, 7 York Road, Parktown, 2193, Johannesburg, Republic of South Africa. E-mail: Paul.Manger@wits.ac.za