Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society



Self-awareness after traumatic brain injury: A comparison of measures and their relationship to executive functions


NICHOLAS M.  BOGOD  a1 c1, CATHERINE A.  MATEER  a1 and STUART W.S.  MACDONALD  a1
a1 Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Abstract

Poor awareness of deficit is common after brain injury. Recent literature has examined various tools for measurement of this phenomenon; the most widely used being self–other rating scales. Although self–other scale measures have face validity, their criterion-related validity has not been adequately demonstrated, and there is little information as to whether and how they relate to other neuropsychological measures. The present study compared measurement of awareness by the Dysexecutive (DEX) Questionnaire self–other rating scale with the Self-Awareness of Deficits Interview (SADI), a semistructured interview measure. Evaluation of awareness by these measures was compared to tests of executive functioning and IQ. Results indicated significant, albeit marginal relationships between the two measures, and better correlation of the SADI with measures of frontal lobe functioning. The SADI also predicted injury severity. (JINS, 2003, 9, 450–458.)

(Received August 22 2001)
(Revised May 23 2002)
(Accepted June 10 2002)


Key Words: Self-awareness; Executive function; Frontal lobes; Brain injury.

Correspondence:
c1 Reprint requests to: Nicholas M. Bogod, c/o Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, PO Box 3050 STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P5, Canada.


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