Epidemiology and Infection



Assessment of the factors associated with flavivirus seroprevalence in a population in Southern Vietnam


L. M.  BARTLEY  a1 c1, H.  CARABIN  a1, N.  VINH CHAU  a2, V.  HO  a3, C.  LUXEMBURGER  a4 a5, T. T.  HIEN  a2, G. P.  GARNETT  a1 and J.  FARRAR  a4 a5
a1 Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, London, UK
a2 Centre for Tropical Diseases, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
a3 Dong Thap Provincial Hospital, Dong Thap Province, Vietnam
a4 Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Unit, Centre for Tropical Diseases, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
a5 Centre for Tropical Diseases, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

Abstract

Dengue and Japanese encephalitis flaviviruses cause severe disease and are hyperendemic in southern Vietnam. This study assesses associations between sociodemographic factors and flavivirus seroprevalence in this region. Sera were collected from 308 community and hospital-based subjects between April 1996 and August 1997 and tested with an indirect ELISA. The factors associated with seroprevalence were assessed using multivariate logistic regression. In this first report of adjusted prevalence odds ratios (POR) for flavivirus infection in Vietnam, seropositivity was associated with increasing age in children (multiple regression coefficients for a child compared to an adult =−4·975 and for age in children = 0·354) and residence in the city compared to surrounding rural districts. The association with age indicates that subjects were most likely to have acquired infection in early childhood. This is key to the design of Vietnamese health education and immunization programmes.

(Accepted June 17 2001)


Correspondence:
c1 Author for correspondence: Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG.


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