Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy



Brief Clinical Reports

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ANXIETY: AN INVESTIGATION OF THE SYMPTOMS, COGNITIONS, AND SENSITIVITY TOWARDS ANXIETY IN A NONCLINICAL POPULATION


Kerry A. Armstrong  a1 c1 and Nigar G. Khawaja  a1
a1 Queensland Univerity of Technology, Brisbane, Australia

Abstract

Past research has demonstrated that anxiety disorders represent a significant mental health concern. A review of the literature in the area indicates that there is limited information regarding gender differences on the basis of cognitions in clinical or nonclinical samples. The current investigation sought to determine whether any observable gender differences existed in the expression of symptoms, cognitions, and anxiety sensitivity for a nonclinical sample of 48 males and 49 females. Multivariate analyses of variance revealed support for gender differences in the expression of physiological hyperarousal, catastrophic cognitions and a general level of anxiety sensitivity in a nonclinical population. The strengths, limitations, and directions for future research are discussed.


Key Words: Anxiety; gender; catastrophic cognitions; anxiety sensitivity; nonclinical.

Correspondence:
c1 Reprint requests and requests for extended report to Nigar G. Khawaja, Department of Psychology and Counselling, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Carseldine, QLD 4034, Australia. E-mail: n.khawaja@qut.edu.au


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