Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics



SPECIAL SECTION: TECHNOLOGY AND THE BODY: LINKING LIFE AND TECHNOLOGY

“Currents of Hope”: Neurostimulation Techniques in U.S. and U.K. Print Media


ERIC  RACINE  a1 , SARAH  WALDMAN  a2 , NICOLE  PALMOUR  a3 , DAVID  RISSE  a3 and JUDY  ILLES  a4
a1 Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal, Canada
a2 Stanford University, Palo Alto, California
a3 Neuroethics Research Unit, Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal, Canada
a4 Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and Department of Pediatrics (Medical Genetics), Stanford University, Palo Alto, California

Article author query
racine e   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
waldman s   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
palmour n   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
risse d   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 
illes j   [PubMed][Google Scholar] 

The application of neurostimulation techniques such as deep brain stimulation (DBS)—often called a brain pacemaker for neurological conditions like Parkinson's disease (PD)—has generated “currents of hope.” Building on this hope, there is significant interest in applying neurostimulation to psychiatric disorders such as major depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). These emerging neurosurgical practices raise a number of important ethical and social questions in matters of resource allocation, informed consent for vulnerable populations, and commercialization of research. a



Footnotes

a The authors acknowledge the help of Dr. Jarrett Rosenberg, Ofek Bar-Ilan, Stacey Kallem, Allyson Mackey, and Cynthia Forlini. This study was supported by the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal (E.R.), SSHRC (E.R.), and NIH/NINDS R01 #NS045831 (J.I.)



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